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Poblano Chiles

Poblano Chiles

With their heart shape, shiny skin, and deep emerald color, poblano chiles have a special allure, even among the rainbow hues of similar-sized peppers. "Poblanos appeal to a lot of folks because they are big peppers and don't pack too much of a punch," says Monte Skarsgard, chief farming officer of Los Poblanos Organics farm in Albuquerque, N.M. Size and mildness give poblano chiles more versatility than their smaller, spicier counterparts (think jalapeños). Poblanos can be blended into salad dressings, sautéed with onion and garlic for a salsa-like condiment, or recruited to season chilies and stews. Plus, adds Skarsgard, "You can stuff the heck out of them."

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When choosing poblanos, look for the darkest, firmest chiles you can find. "The darker color gives them a more complex flavor—acidity with some smoky sweetness. They also should be so firm that they almost squeak in your paw as you grab them," says Monte Skarsgard of Los Poblanos Organics farm in Albuquerque, N.M.

How to Roast Poblano Chiles
Here are three roasting methods to choose from when preparing poblano chiles.

Oven Preheat oven to 425°F. Rub whole poblanos with oil, and place on baking sheet. Roast 30 to 45 minutes, or until charred on all sides, turning with tongs. Transfer to bowl, cover, and let steam 15 minutes. Rub off skins.

Stove top Place 1 poblano directly on grate of gas burner with flame turned to high. Roast until charred on all sides, turning with tongs. Transfer to bowl, cover, and let steam 15 minutes. Rub off skin.

Grill Grill whole, dry poblanos over medium to medium-high heat until charred and blistered on all sides, turning with tongs. Transfer to bowl, cover, and let steam 15 minutes. Rub off skins.

Comments on this Article

Do you have to roast and remove skin or can you use them without roasting?

What about the smoke point for oils at 425 degrees? Is there a specific oil to use at this temperature?