Healing Foods

Ginger

This sweet, hot Asian spice relieves pain and nausea, and may thwart cholesterol and cancer
ginger

Probably best known for its ability to relieve nausea, ginger is another powerful healing flavor source. Gingerols and shogaols, plant compounds that give ginger its spicy-hot taste and stimulating aroma, are anti-inflammatories that can reduce pain from colds, flu, sore throat, headache, cramps, and even osteoarthritis, without the stomach irritation often linked to ibuprofen. Early research hints that ginger could also inhibit growth of certain types of cancer cells, including those in the ovaries and gastrointestinal tract. A recent study published in the Saudi Medical Journal indicates that ginger may also lower cholesterol levels significantly, thereby benefiting heart health.

Choose It & Use It
Cook with fresh grated or candied ginger, or brew ginger tea. (Steep 2 tablespoons fresh grated ginger in a mug of boiling water for 5 minutes; strain.) Enjoy Asian, Caribbean, and Indian dishes, which traditionally contain fresh ginger, and opt for baked goods laced with fresh, dried, or candied forms, such as gingerbread, gingersnaps, spice cake, and pumpkin pie. Caution: children under 2 should not ingest ginger.

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Yukon Gold and Baby Spinach Masala

Yukon Gold and Baby Spinach Masala

Why Yukon gold potatoes? Because their creamy but firm texture make them a perfect fit for stews, plus the tender skin doesn’t need to be peeled. Serve with steamed rice, and a sweet-and-sour chutney, such as Fresh Mango Chutney on vegetariantimes.com.

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Soft Gingerbread Cookies

Soft Gingerbread Cookies

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The secret to keeping these cookies soft and chewy is to roll out the dough on plastic wrap or wax paper while it’s still warm; then chill it before cutting into shapes. To take to a party, stack the plastic-wrapped, pre-rolled strips of dough on a baking sheet. For an

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Ginger Tea

Ginger Tea

Ginger is Mother Nature’s protective cloak, shielding us from sickness on winter days. This tea is very spicy—if it tastes too strong, dilute it with more hot water and honey. Traditional advice is not to drink more than 2 cups of ginger tea a day unless you are

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Pickled Ginger

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Once you’ve made your own pickled ginger, you’ll wonder why you ever bothered with the store-bought variety. Look for fresh ginger roots that have pale, tight, shiny skins with no puckering. Pickled ginger slices will keep several months in the fridge.

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comments

I love all i am learning about Ginger.

joanne padmore - 2013-03-10 15:41:11