Healing Foods

Soy

One or two daily servings of Asia's favorite veggie protein curbs heart disease and certain cancers
soy

Although sporadic reports have challenged the benefits of soy, the fact is, studies have consistently shown that this protein- and fiber-rich source of omega-3 fats and disease-fighting isoflavones promotes heart health and reduces the risk of cancers of the prostate and breast. In addition, phytoestrogens in this ancient Asian staple may counter natural estrogen’s negative effects on women—such as formation of uterine fibroids—and lessen menopausal symptoms. One caveat: the jury is still out on whether soy is good or bad for postmenopausal women who have been diagnosed with hormone-sensitive cancers. It’s best for these women to limit soy intake for now.

Choose It & Use It
Enjoy one or two servings daily of organic soy foods—the less processed the better. One serving: 1/2 cup tofu, tempeh, or edamame, 1 cup soymilk, or 1 ounce soy nuts. Enrich sauces, smoothies, and soups with silken tofu. Use soft tofu in scrambles or in place of ricotta cheese. Enjoy firm tofu (press out liquid) and tempeh sliced and grilled, diced for stir-fries, or crumbled like ground meat. Snack on edamame and soy nuts.

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Vegetable Gyoza and Edamame Succotash

Vegetable Gyoza and Edamame Succotash

Gyoza are crescent-shaped Japanese dumplings (sometimes called pot stickers) that can be steamed or pan-fried and are usually served as an appetizer. Here, they are stir-fried with frozen edamame succotash and topped with a black bean sauce for a spicy main dish. If you can’t find edamame succotash

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Tempeh in Hearty Mushroom-Lager Sauce

Tempeh in Hearty Mushroom-Lager Sauce

This filling entrée tastes like it’s been simmered for hours instead of just 20 minutes. To sweeten the slightly bitter sauce, stir in 1 Tbs. agave nectar with the mustard and use 11/2 cups beer and 1 cup water. Serve over rice or Mashed Potatoes with Chives.

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Black Bean and Edamame Sliders

Black Bean and Edamame Sliders

Here’s the veg answer to Sloppy Joes—edamame lightens up a black bean mixture to keep these sliders from tasting too dense.

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Butternut Squash & Edamame Zosui with Ginger–Green Onion Relish

Butternut Squash & Edamame Zosui with Ginger–Green Onion Relish

Zosui is a Japanese soup made with leftover cooked rice. This comforting dish is great when you want something nourishing but not too heavy.

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Edamame Pâté Sandwiches

Edamame Pâté Sandwiches

The pâté can also be spread on crackers or thinned with additional water and used as a dip.

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Ginger-Miso Yam Wraps

Ginger-Miso Yam Wraps

Not Yet Rated

Tofu and edamame give these wraps plenty of protein. Feel free to substitute chard or flat-leafed kale for the collards.

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