Technique

Just Add Liquid

Deglazing is as easy as sizzling a little wine, broth, water, or alcohol in a skillet or pan
Just Add Liquid

Stop! Don’t scrub that pan——deglaze it. The stuck-on stuff that remains after sautéing is actually caramelized bits of food.  When liquid is added to the skillet, it sizzles up, lifting the browned bits off the bottom. A few minutes of simmering the deglazed liquid lend it a silky texture and concentrated flavors for rich gravies, stew juices, pan sauces, and even salad dressings.

3 Easy Steps

1. Measure liquids in advance Browned bits in the pan enhance flavor; blackened bits add bitterness—so make sure your liquid is ready to go. For a quick pan sauce, you’ll need a few tablespoons of liquid and a few seconds of deglazing. For a saucier dish, count on a few cups of liquid and a few extra minutes of simmering.

2. Start browning Make sure your veggies are well browned before you pour in the deglazing liquid. That way, veggies will contribute maximum browning flavor to the dish. Before pouring in liquids, be sure the pan is hot, and be ready to stir with a sturdy spatula or spoon already in hand.

3. Sizzle and scrape Pour in the liquid—as it sizzles and bubbles up, scrape the spatula across the bottom of the pan to free as much of the stuck-on stuff as you can. With small amounts of liquid, work fast. Take the pan off the heat to scrape if it looks like liquids are evaporating too quickly.

October 2011 p.72

get the recipes

Colorful Asian Slaw with Warm Ginger-Lime Dressing

Colorful Asian Slaw with Warm Ginger-Lime Dressing

A warm dressing of deglazed pan juices gives this room-temperature slaw a flavor boost. Top with tofu and serve over brown rice for a light supper.

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Brussels Sprouts Ragout with Lemon Pan Sauce

A ragoût is like a veggie stew, only more elegant and less “saucy.” This version gains great flavor from sautéing each veggie separately until tender and brown.

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Mushroom and Red Wine Gravy

Mushroom and Red Wine Gravy

Not Yet Rated

Try this sauce with tofu steaks, mashed potatoes, or polenta. If you like a mellower gravy, stir in a few tablespoons of cream at the end.

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Brown-Braised Fingerling Potatoes

For this recipe, choose fingerlings that are all about the same thickness so they cook evenly.

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