Vegan Gourmet

Thin Is In

Dazzle diners with easy, elegant fruit and vegetable carpaccios
Thin Is In

Carpaccio used to refer only to thinly sliced raw red meat (ick!) drizzled with a sauce. (Beef carpaccio was supposedly invented at Harry’s Bar in Venice in 1950.) Chefs have since discovered the limitless possibilities of combining superthin fruit and veggie slices with complementary sauces, and started creating eye-catching offerings such as tomato carpaccio as an appetizer and pineapple carpaccio for dessert. The chic technique is easy to re-create at home, as the following recipes show.

Make-Ahead Tip
Fruit and vegetable carpaccios can be prepared several hours ahead. Simply arrange the fruit or vegetables on serving plates, and cover with plastic wrap, pressing to make sure wrap is touching the slices to prevent browning or drying out. Remove plastic wrap, then drizzle with sauce before serving.

June 2011 p.40

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Pineapple Carpaccio with Thai Basil and Blueberries

Pineapple Carpaccio with Thai Basil and Blueberries

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Thai basil has a stronger anise note than Italian sweet basil, and pairs beautifully with pineapple, but sweet basil may be substituted. Salting the pineapple brings out the flavor of a less than stellar fruit. Leftover syrup combines refreshingly with lime, lemon, or grapefruit juice and still or

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Strawberry and Star Fruit Carpaccio

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Here’s a spectacularly simple dessert. Choose larger strawberries to match the size of the star fruit slices, and alternate them on serving plates or a pretty platter. Star fruit tastes best when it’s yellow in color, with hints of green.

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Portobello Carpaccio with Orange-Kalamata Tapenade

Portobello Carpaccio with Orange-Kalamata Tapenade

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Slicing mushrooms on the bias, angling the knife, rather than cutting perpendicular to the cutting board makes for broader but not thicker slices and a professional-looking presentation.

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Spicy Jicama Carpaccio

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If you can’t find jicama for this recipe, substitute peeled, thinly sliced cucumbers or baby turnips. Poblano chiles range from mild to having a bit of heat, so it’s best to taste the chile before sprinkling over the jicama.

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comments

The Portobello Carpaccio with orange-Kalamate Tapenade was delicious!

Sandy - 2012-07-23 23:05:27