Wickedly Delicious!

Celebrate the flavors and colors of fall with this spectacular seasonal menu
Wickedly Delicious!

Halloween party or harvest feast? You decide. Since Fright Night falls on a Friday this year, we thought it would be fun to do it up right. Our spicy, Southwestern-inspired menu puts pumpkin (filled with a savory stew) front and center for October 31, but it would suit any autumn get-together—even Thanksgiving! Whatever the occasion, the dishes are sure to enchant guests and put them in the spirit—spooky or celebratory—of the season.

 

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Halloween Party Mix

Halloween Party Mix

Not Yet Rated

These tasty nibbles make a festive alternative to chips or roasted nuts.

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Harvest Canapés with Chipotle Cheese Topping

Harvest Canapés with Chipotle Cheese Topping

Not Yet Rated

A pumpkin-shaped cookie cutter gives these hors d’oeuvres a harvest holiday feel. Try other shapes as well, but don’t use ones that have too many small edges or angles, which can make spreading the cheese topping difficult.

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Poblano-Cucumber Salsa

Poblano-Cucumber Salsa

This cool, slightly spicy condiment can be served with tortilla chips as an hors d’oeuvre or used as a topping for black bean soup.

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Spicy Fall Stew Baked in a Pumpkin

Spicy Fall Stew Baked in a Pumpkin

You don’t need a magic spell to turn a pumpkin into the edible serving dish for this satisfying autumn recipe. If you can’t find a large pumpkin or squash, bake this stew in two smaller ones. Serve with Poblano-Cucumber Salsa (linked below).

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Arugula Salad with Roasted Grapes

Arugula Salad with Roasted Grapes

Roasted grapes and a homemade shallot vinaigrette turn a simple salad into a spectacular side dish or first course.

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Mexican Mocha Pudding with Pumpkin Cream

Mexican Mocha Pudding with Pumpkin Cream

Adding pumpkin to whipped cream gives it flavor and color while trimming the fat from each serving. Store extra Whipped Pumpkin Cream covered in the refrigerator for up to three days.

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comments

I agree with MF. Hominy refers to the whole kernel (you can see them as the white round things in the soup). You're not going to get the same effect with corn. Look in the canned veggie isle or the mexican isle. I promise they have it at your grocery store and it is worth getting for this recipe!

Ray - 2011-09-28 20:26:54

Hominy is not the same thing as grits or polenta. It is the whole corn (not ground) and is purchased canned.

MF - 2010-11-17 14:56:59

Green tomatoes sub well for tomatillos, canned corn would work for the hominy.

Jenny - 2010-11-08 00:21:41

Re: Eva Hominy is another name for grits. They're in the cereal isle with the oatmeal. The tomatillos have a unique flavor, so there isn't really a direct replacement. In this recipe a salsa verde might work, just make sure there are tomatillos in it.

Brittany - 2010-10-27 23:28:09

Tomatillos are those little, tomato-like things in the produce section of the grocery store. They often have a brownish, papery, loose skin on the outside. They're used to make salsa verde (the green salsa you get in some Mexican restaurants). Hominy is found in cans in the international isle of the grocery store - in the Mexican section. It's dried white or yellow corn with the hull and germ removed.

Barb - 2010-10-11 17:45:52

Eva- Tomatillos are in the produce dept. next to the tomatos Hominy you can get canned-look on the aisle next to the corn.

Lynne Kuhne - 2010-10-11 17:24:28

Eva, You could get canned mild green chiles and they will likely have the same effect. For hominy, you could use polenta (not the premade log, but the dry polenta).

Shana - 2010-10-11 15:39:22

Re: spicy fall stew baked in pumpking.... Can anyone recommend a substitute for: a) tomatillos b) hominy I have no idea what these are or where to get them. I am having a vegetarian friend over for dinner and would like to make something special for her......

Eva - 2010-10-11 01:07:07

For Mexican or Southwest recipes, hominy is the English word for pozole and does refer to the whole grain. The ground version would be called masa. The corn used for either has been soaked in water with slake lime to remove the outer shell, then dried. Tomatillos also com canned and work well for salsas if you can't find the fresh.

CasiNada - 2011-10-29 13:26:02