What Do I Do with Carrot Greens?

By Aurelia d'Andrea September 3, 2013 Categories: What Do I Do with...

You see them in knee-high piles after the twice-weekly farmers’ market in my neighborhood; the verdant remains of the day’s carrot sales. The long, lanky tops, their shiny green leaves vaguely reminiscent of Italian parsley, are mostly overlooked by home cooks and professional chefs alike. This is probably due to the unrelenting rumor about the leaves being poisonous (due to their resemblance of the extremely toxic plant Queen Anne’s Lace).

While it’s true that carrot leaves do contain alkaloids and nitrates—which some people can be sensitive to in the same way that others are sensitive to potatoes, eggplants, and other nightshade plants—they aren’t toxic unless you eat them by the bushel. They are, however, versatile and downright tasty, depending on how you prepare them.

You can use carrot greens in the same way you’d use parsley, either as a garnish, or minor player in salads, or as the no-holds-barred star of the culinary show. From carrot-top pesto to carrot-greens soup, the possibilities are vast and varied, and come with a nutritional bonus: They’re packed with potassium, chlorophyll, and other nutrients with health-supporting benefits. 

This simple salad marries carrot greens with the humble chickpea and a dash of cumin to unite the flavors and textures. Try bringing a bowlful to your next potluck and having your friends guess the ingredients.

Warm Chickpea and Carrot-top Salad

Serves 4

1 tsp. olive oil
1 tsp. ground cumin
1 medium onion, minced
1 14-oz can chickpeas, drained
1 cup finely chopped carrot greens,
Juice of 1 lemon
Salt, to taste

Heat oil over medium heat. Add cumin, and sauté 1 minute, or until fragrant. 
Add onion and sauté until golden, about 2 minutes. 
Add chickpeas and sauté until heated through and any liquid has evaporated, about 2 minutes.
Remove pan from heat and add carrot greens. Toss, then transfer to a serving bowl and season with lemon juice and salt before serving.

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comments

Will try this one today

Jane Mac-Leay - 2014-03-27 18:05:10

Queen Anne's Lace (Daucus carota) and cultivated carrot (also Daucus carota) are the exact same genus and species. The cultivated carrot's subspecies is sativus. Queen Anne's lace is no more "toxic" than our garden carrot -- is it possible you've confused that with poison hemlock (Conium maculatum)? Their leaves can be confused with carrots by those who haven't studied both carefully. I've eaten Queen Anne's Lace roots, stems and leaves for decades with no ill effects, and intercrop it with my tomatoes to boost production and with lettuce to keep the soil cooler. Thanks for letting me correct a potential misconception of a wonderful wild food, and for sharing the salad recipe and other ideas with those of us who are concerned about what to do with the "throwaways"!

Rachel - 2013-10-16 20:27:49

yet,I'am not try it but I will add it to my salad

ibrahim dasoki - 2013-09-16 13:58:13

Rabbits LOVE these! You will make your favorite bunny owner's day by giving them the greens!

Lindsay - 2013-09-06 18:02:35

Sounds tasty.

tillacum - 2013-09-03 21:05:54