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Nutritionist Advice

Chia Seed Pudding

There’s a reason chia seeds are still trending: They’re loaded with protein, fiber, and omega-3s. Chef Mark Reinfeld, the founder of Vegan Fusion and the instructor for our next online course, Vegan Fusion: Essentials of Plant-Based Cuisine, shows us how to prep the seeds to use in pudding, smoothies and more.

Still curious about chia? We’ve got you covered:  

How to Peel Ginger

Fresh ginger works wonders in soups, stir-fries, and even dessert, but tackling its knobby exterior can be a challenge. The first step? Ditch that vegetable peeler. Vegan chef Mark Reinfeld shows us the right way to peel fresh ginger for recipes in this short video. This technique speeds up prep and reduces the amount of ginger flesh wasted.

cauliflower rice

Thinking of going vegan but not sure where to begin? Our Go Vegan course with veteran vegan chef Julie Morris will help you discover nutritious, healthy vegan cusine. In this month-long vegan bootcamp, you'll learn new recipes, be connected to an online community, and have online resources that you can keep on hand to refer back to, even after the course is completed.

Learn more about the Go Vegan course to start your new lifestyle!

Veg Cooking Tip # 1: Steam greens as you cook grains.

Chances are you'll catch at least a cough or sniffle this cold and flu season. But before you open the medicine cabinet to treat those head, eye, nose, or throat symptoms, consider a trip to your local grocer. Research shows that a number of  foods have the nutritional chops to boose your body's natural defenses against foreign invaders. So, during this sickly season, turn to these cold-busters to help fortify your immune system and shake the symptoms.

 

Black lentils

Tired of looking for protein in all the same places? Try these new power-packed, flavorful sources.

Protein is the building block of life: a macronutrient vital to creating and repairing everything from bones to muscles to skin. And if you want to maintain a healthy body weight, research shows that it’s best not to skimp on protein. It provides a sense of satiety, which puts the brakes on overeating. You probably know that tofu, yogurt, and beans can all help you get your fill. But these other protein heavyweights are delicious options to explore, too. 

New vegetarians and vegans who enthusiastically pile their plates with whole grains and vegetables may be dismayed to experience bloating, gas, or other stomach upsets—and mistakenly think they have a food allergy or that this diet isn’t for them. Not so! Shift to a more plant-based diet gradually, and most likely your body will adjust just fine to a vegetarian
or vegan diet.

“How can I survive eating only leaves every day?” “There is no way I could ever follow a plant-based diet; I’d always be starving!” “Whenever I eat salad, I’m hungry an hour later.”

These are all comments I’ve heard when discussing a plant-based lifestyle with large groups. A persistent myth about plant-centric diets is that eating plates full of green leafy vegetables will leave you feeling constantly hungry.

First, plant-centric diets are much more exciting than simply plates of green, leafy vegetables. 

Myth: A vegetarian diet equals weight loss.

Truth: Following a vegetarian diet does not guarantee that you will lose weight. Although research shows that vegetarian diets are associated with a lower BMI and leaner body mass, if you don't pay attention to food choices, portion sizes or calories, weight gain is just as possible. A plant-based diet can be low in calories, and high in nutrients and fiber--but only if the right foods are consumed in moderate quantities.

Myth: You crave a certain food because you’re deficient in one of its nutrients.

If you’ve ever found yourself desperately pushing through a crowd to get at the double-chocolate cupcakes in a display window, you’re well aware of the power of food cravings. Some people suggest that such cravings are an effort by your body to correct a deficiency in a certain nutrient. In the case of chocolate, that might be magnesium—cocoa is considered a good source of this vital mineral.

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