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Thanksgiving

Seared French Beans with Shallots and Hazelnut Picada

Chef: Richard Landau of Vedge in Philadelphia. “Here’s a re-imagined answer to the string bean casserole—ugly, brown, and bubbly with a can of soup for its sauce. This new, light approach features a Spanish crumble called picada. It’s a great seasonal touch and just enough to take French beans over the top, says Landau. Picada, a savory Spanish garnish traditionally made with almonds, can be as thin as tahini paste or as dry as a crumble. If your green beans aren’t perfectly fresh, try blanching them in salted water for 2 minutes before roasting to bring them back to life.

Shepherd’s Pie

Chef: Jon DuBois of Green Zebra in Chicago. “This plant-based answer to the rib-sticking standby is surprisingly simple to put together and stars the best of the harvest season, all crowned with a sweet potato mash that’s the color of an autumn sunset,” says DuBois. Winter squash and root vegetables make up the filling for an easy-to-make casserole that’s hearty enough to serve as a main dish.

Classic Bread Stuffing

Sometimes, simpler is better. This basic stuffing will soak up all the delicious sauces and juices of the other foods on your Thanksgiving table. You can jazz up the recipe with 1/2 cup of add-ins, such as chestnuts, chopped nuts, or dried fruit.

Holiday Bread Cornucopia

This cornucopia is easy to make using poster board and foil, and the result looks like a centerpiece created by a professional baker. 

Cherry-Pistachio Crisps

Deep-red cherries bubbling under a sweet, fragrant, pistachio-flecked topping make individual crisps especially festive. Serve warm topped with ice cream, whipped cream, or Greek yogurt and a sprinkle of chopped pistachios.

Pear Almond Cake

This light-and-luscious cake is the perfect ending to any holiday meal. It stores well for a couple of days in the fridge—just be sure to bring it to room temperature before serving.

Hot-and-Sour Celery Pickles

These simple refrigerator pickles can round out a traditional relish tray or be served as an appetite-whetting hors d’oeuvre. The recipe calls for celery hearts that yield larger, paler slices than stalks. Red chiles create a pretty color contrast, but any hot chiles will work in the recipe. The pickles will keep up to two weeks refrigerated.

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