Young Coconut Pad Thai with Almond Chile Sauce Recipe | Vegetarian Times Skip to main content

Young Coconut Pad Thai with Almond Chile Sauce

Charlie Trotter writes, "The young coconut strands are slightly sweet and tender, emulating the classic rice noodle. The intense flavor and creamy texture of the Almond Chile Sauce adds a degree of lusciousness to the crispy vegetables." Recipe from Raw by Charlie Trotter and Roxanne Klein (Ten Speed Press, 2003).

Ingredients: 

Ingredients: 

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2 Tbs. tamarind juice (see note)
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1 ½ Tbs. maple syrup
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2 ¾ Tbs. organic soy sauce
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1 ½ tsp. minced garlic
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1 ¼ tsp. minced serrano chile
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1 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil
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¼ tsp. sea salt
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1 ½ cups julienned zucchini
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1 cup thinly shredded red cabbage
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1 ½ cups julienned carrots
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½ cup julienned red onion
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1 cup julienned Granny Smith apple, unpeeled
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½ cup julienned red bell pepper
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3 cups julienned young coconut meat
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1 serrano chile, thinly sliced
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2 Tbs. whole fresh coriander leaves
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¼ cup raw cashews, coarsely chopped
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3 tsp. white sesame oil
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½ cup raw almond butter
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1 Tbs. minced fresh ginger
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2 Tbs. freshly squeezed lemon juice
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2 Tbs. maple syrup
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2 cloves garlic
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1 Tbs. organic soy sauce
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1 Thai finger chile
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¼ cup water, to thin

Instructions: 

1. Purée tamarind, maple syrup, 1 & 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce, garlic, minced chile, olive oil and salt until smooth. Place zucchini, cabbage, carrots, red onion, apple, red bell pepper, coconut meat, sliced serrano chile and fresh coriander leaves in a mixing bowl. Add tamarind purée, and toss together until evenly distributed. Season the pad Thai to taste with salt and pepper.

2. Toss cashews together in a small mixing bowl with 1 teaspoon of white sesame oil, and season to taste with salt and pepper.

3. To prepare the Almond Chile Sauce: Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Add water to thin if necessary.

4. To serve, arrange some of the pad Thai mixture in center of each plate. Spoon some Almond Chile Sauce and remaining soy sauce and white sesame oil around pad Thai. Sprinkle with chopped cashews.

Note: To make tamarind juice, soak pulp, including seeds, in warm water in the ratio of 1 part pulp to 3 & 1/2 parts water—or 1 tablespoon pulp to 3 & 1/2 tablespoons warm water. After 15 minutes, squeeze tamarind pulp to extract liquid. Discard pulp and seeds, and use juice as needed.

Wine Suggestions
The unctuous texture and flavor contributed to this dish by the coconut, nuts and nut oil/butter should be met and balanced with a wine that invokes other tropical fruits and highlights the fresh chile. Gewürtztraminer can do all that. Try Domaine Weinbach Gewürtztraminer Cuvée Laurence.

Nutrition Information: 

Calories: 
790
Protein: 
12 g
Total Fat: 
63 g
Saturated Fat: 
33 g
Carbohydrates: 
55 g
Cholesterol: 
mg
Sodium: 
1160 mg
Fiber: 
14 g
Sugar: 
32 g
Yield: 
SERVES 4

Comments on this Recipe

I'm just wondering how this can be considered 'healing' or 'healthy' when each serving is 790 calories with 63 grams of fat, 33 of which are saturated; and to top it off, 1160mg of sodium???

Just wondering - young coconut? It sounds like that would not be the same as the typical coconut a grocery store might carry. In which case, where do I find one? And tamarind? I have Tamarind paste, but I'm not certain where to find the actual fruit. Nor a Thai finger chile or even white sesame oil. I go to a supermarket with an incredibly well stocked international section, and I have access to a few good ethnic grocery stores, so I'm rarely stumped. But I might have trouble with this one. And even if I could find it all, as utterly luscious as this sounds, it also sounds like far too much WORK! I don't think I have a tool for all that julienne work. It's too bad, really, because it sounds so very lovely!

look in the mexican side of the grocery store, for the tamarind and finger chile. I live in southern california and all the ingredients are avialable.

You can find cheap mandolin slicers at Asian markets, like this one (on amazon's site): http://www.amazon.com/Kyocera-BN1-Japanese-Mandoline-Slicer/dp/B0000VZ57C They really make recipes like this a snap! A $20 dollar bill well spent!

This sounds delicious, but way too many very costly ingredients.