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A Beginner's Guide to Tofu Varieties - Vegetarian Times

A Beginner's Guide to Tofu Varieties

Even the most experienced veg chefs suffer tofu insecurity every once in a while. Silken or soft? Sprouted or regular? Here are the best uses for each type of tofu (plus recipes!).
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Even the most experienced veg chefs suffer tofu insecurity every once in a while. Silken or soft? Sprouted or regular? Here are the best uses for each type of tofu:

Silken Ultra-smooth and jiggly soft, silken tofu is ideal for puréeing as a base for soups, dressings, dips, and sauces. It also makes excellent dessert puddings and pie fillings.

Soft Whenever you want curds or crumbles for scrambles or egg-like salads, reach for soft tofu. Similarly, it can replace ricotta in lasagna or stuffed shells. Soft tofu can also be puréed, but the results will be thicker and heavier than what you’d get with silken tofu.

Firm/Extra-Firm The most versatile choice, firm tofu can go both ways. It crumbles well for scrambles or eggless salad, but blotted or pressed, it holds its shape as slabs or cubes.

Super-Firm Dense and dry, super-firm tofu is an especially good stand-in for feta cheese. Crumbled into stews, it absorbs flavors and adds texture.

Sprouted You won’t find chewy bits of sprouted soybeans in blocks of sprouted tofu, but you will get more nutrients (and more fat and calories). It comes in an array of textures—silken, soft, firm, extra firm.

Baked Convenience food that’s good for you! Chewy, dense baked tofu is the most straightforward substitute for meat in stir-fries, casseroles, fajitas, sandwiches, and salads. It comes pre-seasoned in an array of flavors, such Italian, teriyaki, and Mexican.

Got tofu? Try these easy tofu-tastic recipes:

Tofu Rancheros

Sushi Rice Bowls with Tofu Teriyaki

Tofu Crème au Chocolat

Vegetable Stew with Tofu Feta

Baked Tofu Salad with Broccoli and Pineapple